Modern US International

Modern US International high school education requirements

Cyber School design & planning docs as attachments at page bottom

http://www.educationplanner.org/students/self-assessments/index.shtml

International Baccalaureate

PSAT

Students cannot register for it online and have to register for it through the high schools which are members of the College Board. The test is composed of three sections: Math, Critical Reading, and Writing Skills,

College Major Quiz

http://homeworktips.about.com/library/maj/bl_majors_quiz.htm

Harvard Application Requirements

High School Preparation

Are there secondary school course requirements for admission?

Is it to a student's advantage to take advanced, accelerated or honors courses?

Must a student have certain grades or marks to be considered for admission?

How familiar is the Admissions Committee with secondary schools? their rigor? what marks mean in a particular school or educational system??

Does Harvard rank secondary schools in the U.S. and abroad?

What if a student has attended more than one secondary school?

Does Harvard consider non-required test results, such as Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Abitur, or GCE A-levels?

Standardized Tests

Which standardized tests does Harvard require?

How do I report my test scores?

Are there minimum required SAT, ACT, or SAT Subject Test scores?

Which SAT Subject Tests should students take?

Does Harvard consider scores from previous administrations of the SAT, ACT, or SAT Subject Test?

If a student takes the required tests more than once, which results does Harvard consider?

Application Requirements

Which teachers should write recommendations?

Should students send supplementary recommendations?

Is there a personal interview?

How can I request a fee waiver?

How can I pay my application fee?

Can I get a receipt for my application fee?

Application Procedures & Policies

What kind of admissions criteria does Harvard use?

How important are extracurricular activities in admissions decisions?

Who reads applications?

Does Harvard admit students to enter in the spring semester?

Are there quotas for certain kinds of applicants?

Are a student's chances of admission enhanced if a relative has attended Harvard?

Is there a separate admissions process for prospective athletes?

Are a student's chances of admission enhanced by submitting application materials before other applicants?

Are a student's chances of admission hurt if there are other applicants from his or her school or community?

Is there a wait list?

May admitted students defer their matriculations at Harvard?

May students apply to Harvard if they are admitted under binding Early Decision programs at other colleges?


High School Preparation

Are there secondary school course requirements for admission?

There is no single academic path we expect all students to follow, but the strongest applicants take the most rigorous secondary school curricula available to them. An ideal four-year preparatory program includes four years of English, with extensive practice in writing; four years of math; four years of science: biology, chemistry, physics, and an advanced course in one of these subjects; three years of history, including American and European history; and four years of one foreign language.

Is it to a student's advantage to take advanced, accelerated or honors courses?

Yes. Although schools provide different opportunities, students should pursue the most demanding college-preparatory program available.

Must a student have certain grades or marks to be considered for admission?

The Admissions Committee recognizes that schools vary by size, academic program, and grading policies, so we do not have rigid grade requirements. There is no single academic path we expect all students to follow, but the strongest applicants take the most rigorous secondary school curricula available to them. We do seek students who achieve at a high level, and most admitted students rank in the top 10-15% of their graduating classes.

How familiar is the Admissions Committee with secondary schools? their rigor? what marks mean in a particular school or educational system?

We have worked hard for many years to learn about schools in the U.S. and around the world. Our careful study of different schools, curricula, and educational systems benefits, too, from information we receive directly each year from schools, extensive personal communication we have with school personnel, and the interview reports we receive from our alumni/ae, who meet thousands of applicants to the College each year. We can always learn more, so we welcome information students think might be helpful to the Admissions Committee in understanding their accomplishments in their school communities.

Does Harvard rank secondary schools in the U.S. and abroad?

No. While we understand there are differences in the overall strengths of secondary schools, we are most interested in how well applicants have taken advantage of available resources.

What if a student has attended more than one secondary school?

We ask students to provide Secondary School Reports from the college counselor of each school they have attended in their last two years of secondary school.

Does Harvard consider non-required test results, such as Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Abitur, or GCE A-levels?

Yes. We value any information that helps us form a complete picture of an applicant's academic interests and strengths.


Standardized Tests

Which standardized tests does Harvard require?

Harvard requires applicants to submit the results of either the SAT Reasoning Test or the ACT with writing component. All applicants, must also submit the results of two SAT Subject Tests. The Admissions Committee continues to consider test results in light of students' educational opportunities.

How do I report my test scores?

Please note that in order for your application to be considered complete,we must have your official test scores submitted directly to Harvard by the testing agency on your behalf.

Directions for sending your official scores to the admissions office can be found atwww.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/scores/sending.html for the SAT and SAT Subject Tests and www.actstudent.org/scores/send/ for the ACT. Harvard College official codes are 3434 for the SAT and 1840 for the ACT.

Applicants can use the Application Status Website to check whether we have official scores on file.

If we do not receive your official scores from the testing agency, we will be unable to make a decision on your file. Please plan accordingly.

Are there minimum required SAT, ACT, or SAT Subject Test scores?

Harvard does not have clearly defined, required minimum scores; however, the majority of students admitted to the College represent a range of scores from roughly 600 to 800 on each section of the SAT Reasoning Test as well as on the SAT Subject Tests. We regard test results as helpful indicators of academic ability and achievement when considered thoughtfully among many other factors.

Which SAT Subject Tests should students take?

To satisfy our application requirements, applicants must take two SAT Subject Tests. Students should not submit two Subject Tests in mathematics to meet this requirement. Candidates whose first language is not English should ordinarily not use a Subject Test in their first language to meet the two Subject Tests requirement. . Applicants may wish to convey the breadth of their academic interests by taking tests in different subjects. All students are encouraged to submit additional Subject Tests (which may include one in a student’s first language), Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate test results, or any other evidence of the breadth and depth of their academic accomplishments.

Does Harvard consider scores from previous administrations of the SAT, ACT, or SAT Subject Tests?

Yes.

If a student takes the required tests more than once, which results does Harvard consider?

We consider a student's best test scores, but it is generally our experience that taking tests more than twice offers diminishing returns.


Application Requirements

Which teachers should write recommendations?

Teachers who know the applicant well and who have taught him or her in academic subjects (preferably in the final two years of secondary school) most often provide us with the most valuable testimony.

Should students send supplementary recommendations?

While we can make careful evaluations with required recommendations, we are happy to read helpful letters from people directly familiar with applicants' lives outside the classroom. Such letters are not necessary, however, and it is generally advisable to submit no more than two or three.

Is there a personal interview?

When and where possible, we try to arrange for applicants to meet with alumni/ae in or near their school communities. No candidate is at a disadvantage if an interview cannot be arranged. In the U.S., Canada and the U.K., an alumnus/a will contact an applicant directly by phone, email, or letter if such an interview is possible. If you live outside these areas, please check our website for country-specific instructions.

How can I request a fee waiver?

If paying the $75 fee would cause undue financial hardship for your family, we encourage you to request a fee waiver. You should contact your guidance counselor for assistance in obtaining the waiver. Information on the College Board fee waiver program is available athttp://www.collegeboard.com/student/apply/the-application/922.html. Your counselor may use the College Board form, or your school’s own form. If no form is available, your counselor may choose to write a personal letter testifying that he or she is familiar with your family’s financial circumstances and believes payment would cause hardship. 

If you submit a form signed by authorized school personnel, you can assume it will be accepted. If we have any questions, we will contact you.

How can I pay my application fee?

The $75 application processing fee can be paid online through the online application system (either theCommon Application or the Universal College Application). Please note that the Common Application and Universal Application websites are operated independently, and their respective offices are better able to assist you with specific logistical issues you may encounter while submitting the application forms or your fee through their sites.

You may also send a check drawn on a US bank in US dollars to:
Harvard College Admissions
86 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Please be sure to write the name and date of birth of the applicant on the check!

Can I get a receipt for my application fee?

If you paid on-line, your e-mail confirmation is your receipt. If you paid by check, your cancelled check (or image sent by your bank) is your receipt. We do not send any other acknowledgment of payment. If payment is missing, we will contact you.

Important note: Payments are tracked only by Harvard's database. Please disregard any notification of payment status posted on the Common Application or Universal College Application website.

If your question has not been answered, please submit your question to admfee@fas.harvard.edu. One of our staff members will respond to your inquiry as soon as possible.


Application Procedures & Policies

What kind of admissions criteria does Harvard use?

There is no formula for gaining admission to Harvard. Academic accomplishment in high school is important, but the Admissions Committee also considers many other criteria, such as community involvement, leadership and distinction in extracurricular activities, and work experience. The Admissions Committee does not use quotas of any kind. We rely on teachers, counselors, headmasters, and alumni/ae to share information with us about applicants' strength of character, their ability to overcome adversity, and other personal qualities--all of which play a part in the Admissions Committee's decisions.

How important are extracurricular activities in admissions decisions?

Each case is different. Harvard seeks to enroll well-rounded students as well as a well-rounded first year class. Thus, some students distinguish themselves for admission due to their unusual academic promise through experience or achievements in study or research. Other students present compelling cases because they are more "well rounded" -- they have contributed in many different ways to their schools or communities. Still other successful applicants are "well lopsided," with demonstrated excellence in one particular endeavor -- academic, extracurricular, or otherwise. Some students bring perspectives formed by unusual personal circumstances or experiences. Like all colleges, we seek to admit the most interesting, able, and diverse class possible.

Who reads applications?

Most applications are read by two or more members of the Admissions Committee, and are considered very carefully in a series of committee meetings where a majority vote is required for admission. The entire process requires several months.

Does Harvard admit students to enter in the spring semester?

No. All students begin study in September to benefit from special programs designed for freshmen.

Are there quotas for certain kinds of applicants ?

The Admissions Committee does not use quotas of any kind.

Are a student's chances of admission enhanced if a relative has attended Harvard?

The application process is the same for all candidates. Among a group of similarly distinguished applicants, the daughters and sons of College alumni/ae may receive an additional look.

Is there a separate admissions process for prospective athletes?

No. We encourage students with athletic talent to contact our Athletic Department for information about any of Harvard's 41 varsity athletic teams.

Are a student's chances of admission enhanced by submitting application materials before other applicants?

No. We request, however, that students submit the Common Application and the Harvard Application Supplement by December 1 if possible. Receipt of these two forms allows us to expedite application processing and to arrange personal interviews more quickly.

Are a student's chances of admission hurt if there are other applicants from his or her school or community?

No. There are no quotas for individual schools, communities, states, or countries. A student's application is compared rigorously with others from around the globe.

Is there a wait list?

Yes. Our wait list includes the strongest applicants whom the Committee was not able to admit but might still wish to consider for admission if spots in the entering class open later. The wait list is not ranked. In some years, we have admitted no one from the wait list; in others, we have admitted more than 100 candidates.

May admitted students defer their matriculations at Harvard?

Harvard College wants to do everything possible to help the students we enroll make the most of their opportunities, avoiding the much reported "burnout" phenomenon that can keep them from reaching their full potential. Harvard's overall graduation rate of 97%, among the highest in the nation, is perhaps due in part to the fact that so many students take time off, before or during college. The Admissions Committee encourages admitted students to defer enrollment for one year to travel, pursue a special project or activity, work or spend time in another meaningful way - provided they do not enroll in a degree-granting program at another college. Most fundamentally, it is a time to step back and reflect, to gain perspective on personal values and goals, or to gain needed life experience in a setting separate from and independent of one's accustomed pressures and expectations. Deferrals for two-year obligatory military services are also granted. Each year, between 40 and 80 students defer their matriculation to the College, and all report their experiences to be uniformly positive; virtually all would do it again. After graduation, large numbers of Harvard students take time off before beginning work or graduate school.

For more thoughts on the advantages of taking time off you can read "Time Off or Burn Out for the Next Generation" written by William R. Fitzsimmons, Dean of Admissions, Harvard College, Marlyn McGrath, Director of Admissions, and Charles Ducey, Director or the Bureau of Study Counsel, Harvard University.

May students apply to Harvard if they are admitted under binding Early Decision programs at other colleges?

No. Students admitted under an Early Decision program at another college must withdraw any pending application to Harvard and are not eligible for admission.



Quickview

(A more detailed list can be found below.)

Application
$75 Application Fee or Waiver
Harvard Supplement
SAT or ACT
2 SAT Subject Tests
Secondary School Report and Mid-year School Report
Two Teacher Evaluations


Detailed View

Application

Harvard accepts the Common Application and the Universal College Application. Both will be treated equally by the Admissions Committee. Please choose one. Please note that the Admissions Committee begins reading applications beginning on December 1st in the order in which they were completed.

For Students Applying Online:

Important: If you plan to/expect to submit an online application, you should complete and submit your online materials as soon as possible. The Common Application requires the submission of your application (or supplement) before releasing to a college your supporting application materials (SSR, Teacher Reports, etc.) To ensure full and timely consideration of your application you should submit your own application materials at the earliest possible time.

It is very important that you submit to us your portion of the Common Application as soon as possible. Until you do so, your application will not be transmitted to the Harvard Admissions Office.

For Students Applying Using a Paper Application (Mailed):

If you are completing a paper copy of the application, you may choose to send your Personal Statement and Short Answer on a separate piece of paper. If you choose to do so, please write your full name, address, date of birth and high school on each page. If you are submitting an electronic copy of the application, you will need to complete these sections before your application will be transmitted to us.

Please also note: If you are submitting your application materials on paper you should ask those who are completing supplementary forms (SSR, Teacher Reports) to provide those materials on paper to us.

Acknowledgement of Receipt of Your Application

The Admissions Office begins sending email applications acknowledgements in early October. We then send acknowledgements (via email) weekly. If you do not receive an acknowledgement of receipt of your application within two weeks of submitting your application, please write to us using this form with the subject line "Confirm Receipt of Application" from the drop down list or call (617) 495-1551. This is very important, because applications can get lost in the mail.

Please note, we will not begin processing applications until October so the earliest you would receive an acknowledgement is mid-October.

Application fee of $75 (or a completed fee waiver request).

The $75 application processing fee can be paid online through the online application system (either the Common Application or the Universal College Application). Please note that the Common Application and Universal Application websites are operated independently, and their respective offices are better able to assist you with specific logistical issues you may encounter while submitting the application forms or your fee through their sites.

You may also send a check drawn on a U.S. bank in U.S. dollars to:

Harvard College Admissions
86 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Please be certain that the applicant's name appears on the check or money order, and staple it to the front page of the Application. If you mail your check separately from the application, please attach a note with your full name and address. For a fee waiver, have your guidance counselor attach a written request to the front of the application.

If paying the application fee would cause a hardship for your family, please request a fee waiver. You or your guidance counselor may use one of the official forms or may simply write a short letter, asking us to waive your fee.

Harvard Supplement

The supplement can be filled out on-line while submitting the Common Application or Universal College Application. Or you can print a copy and mail it to the Admissions Office.

Official score reports from the SAT or ACT

All applicants must take the SAT or the ACT (with the writing component) in addition to the two Subject Tests outlined below.

  • We encourage applicants to submit at least one set of scores from or before the November series. Doing so enables the admissions staff to begin considering applications in December. We recommend that students complete their standardized testing by the December series and have scores reported promptly. January test results may also be submitted for consideration.
  • Read Harvard's statement about Score Choice. There are no score cutoffs, and we do not admit "by the numbers." Students applying to Harvard are free to use the College Board's new Score Choice option and/or a similar option already offered by ACT.
  • Test scores for the middle 50 percent (from the 25th to the 75th percentile) of recently admitted classes range from 700 to 790 on the SAT critical reading section and 690 to 790 on the SAT math section.
  • Please note that in order for your application to be considered complete, we must have your official test scores submitted directly to Harvard by the testing agency on your behalf.
  • Directions for sending your official scores to the admissions office can be found at www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/scores/sending.html for the SAT and SAT Subject Tests and www.actstudent.org/scores/send/ for the ACT. Harvard College official codes are 3434 for the SAT and 1840 for the ACT.
  • Applicants can use the Application Status Website to check whether we have official scores on file.
  • If we do not receive your official scores from the testing agency, we will be unable to make a decision on your file. Please plan accordingly.
  • When registering for tests, please use your name as it will appear on your Harvard application. Using a nickname may prevent your scores from matching up with the rest of your application in our database.
  • If you have a concern regarding your standardized test scores as they appear on your status page, please send a brief message describing the issue to us at scores@fas.harvard.edu. Please be sure to include your full name, date of birth and name of high school in your message.

Official score reports for Two SAT Subject Tests

You may take any two subject tests. Students should not submit two Subject Tests in mathematics to meet this requirement. Candidates whose first language is not English should ordinarily not use a Subject Test in their first language to meet the two Subject Tests requirement. All students are encouraged to submit additional Subject Tests (which may include one in a student’s first language), Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate test results, or any other evidence of the breadth and depth of their academic accomplishments.

Secondary School Report and Mid-Year School Report

Please give these forms to your school counselor or other school advisor and ask that the School Report form be completed and returned to our office as soon as possible. The Mid-Year Report should be returned in February with your latest grades.

If you have attended more than one high school in the past two years, give a second copy of the School Report to your former counselor(s) or school official to complete.

Two Teacher Evaluations

These evaluations must be completed by teachers in different academic subjects who know you well.


Updates

Please do not resend your application in order to make updates. If you need to make changes to your identification or contact information please write to us using this form, and select "Personal/Contact Info Change" from the drop down list. If you need to send updates, additional information or corrections to the content of your application, please select "additions to Application" from the drop down list.

Online High School Courses Approved by UC schools:
At press time, the University had approved the following online providers:

To date, the University has approved the following online providers:

  • APEX Learning Virtual School
  • Aventa Learning
  • Brigham Young University Independent Study (BYU)
  • Connections Academy
  • Education Program for Gifted Youth Online High School at Stanford University (EPGY)
  • Education2020
  • Florida Virtual School
  • K12, Inc.
  • Kaplan Virtual Education
  • Laurel Springs Online
  • National University Virtual High School
  • PASS Program / Cyber High
  • Riverside Virtual School
  • UC College Prep Online (UCCP)
  • UC Irvine Extension
  • VHS, Inc. Virtual High School Global Consortium


Univ.of Nebraska: 402-472-2175

B.Y.U: 800-914-8931

Aventa Online Learning: 800-594-5504 www.aventalearning.com

Univ. of Missouri: 800-609-3727

Indiana University: 800-334-1011

Keystone National High School: 800-255-4937

UC is in discussion with other providers and hopes to expand this list in the coming year.

Since the review process will take an extended period of time to implement, UC will
continue to accept any pre-approved courses offered by UCCP (for 2009-2010) and/or Cyber
High. For more information about the online course policy, see:
www.ucop.edu/a-gGuide/ag/online_course.html.
Note: UC does not accept online courses in the areas of laboratory science (unless a course
requires an on-site wet lab component) or VPStanford ACADEMIC PREPARATION

There is no magic formula for getting into college. It is true, however, your college search has the potential to be enjoyable and successful if you have:

  • taken full advantage of the opportunities available to you in high school
  • achieved at a high level all four years
  • and consulted early on with your high school counselor

Recommended High School Curriculum

We respect the responsibility that high schools, principals, and teachers should have in the development of courses and curricula for their students. For that reason, we do not have a set of required courses for admission to Stanford. We have found, though, that a curriculum emphasizing depth and breadth across the core academic subjects is the best preparation for the academic rigors at Stanford. Our experience has suggested that students who excel in a curriculum like the one below are well-suited for the demands of college academics:

  • English: four years, with significant emphasis on writing and literature.
  • Mathematics: four years, with significant emphasis on fundamental mathematical skills (algebra; trigonometry; plane, solid, and analytic geometry).
  • History/Social Studies: three or more years. Such courses should include the writing of essays.
  • Science: three or more years of laboratory science (including biology, chemistry and physics).
  • Foreign Language: three or more years of the same foreign language. Your study of a foreign language ought to include the development of four basic skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension.

Choosing Courses

We expect applicants to pursue a reasonably challenging curriculum, choosing courses from among the most demanding courses available at your school. We ask you to exercise good judgment here, and to consult with your counselor, teacher, and parents as you construct a curriculum that is right for you. Our hope is that your curriculum will inspire you to develop your intellectual passions, not suffer from unnecessary stress. The students who thrive at Stanford are those who are genuinely excited about learning, not necessarily those who take every single AP, Honors, or Accelerated class just because it has that name.

Advanced Placement Courses and Scores

Our admission process allows – and indeed encourages – the flexibility of a high school to design the most appropriate curricular offerings and opportunities for its students. What a course is named or whether it concludes with a standardized test is considerably less important to us than the energy a student contributes to the learning process and the curiosity with which he or she pursues questions and ideas. Sometimes this challenging high school course load will include advanced placement classes; other high schools choose to offer equally demanding courses that neither carry the AP designation nor lead to an AP exam.

We want to be clear that this is not a case of “whoever has the most APs wins.” Instead, we look for thoughtful, eager and highly engaged students who will make a difference at Stanford and the world beyond, and we expect that they have taken high school course loads of reasonable and appropriate challenge in the context of their school.

As a result, we do not require students to submit AP scores as part of our admission process. AP scores that are reported are acknowledged but rarely play a significant role in the evaluation of an application. Grades earned over the course of a semester, or a year, and evaluations from instructors who can comment on classroom engagement allow us the most detailed insight into a student’s readiness for the academic rigors of Stanford.

Eligibility by examination

To qualify for admission to UC by examination alone, students must satisfy the same examination requirement as students who qualify in the statewide context.

What students need to achieve

Students must earn a minimum UC Score total — calculated according to the eligibility index instructions — of 410 (425 for nonresidents). In addition, students must achieve a minimum score of 580 on each component of the SAT Reasoning Test or 25 on the ACT composite and ACT With Writing test and 580 on each SAT Subject Test.

Students may not use an SAT Subject Test to meet these requirements if they have completed a transferable college course with a grade of C or better in that subject.

An applicant who currently is attending high school may qualify for admission to UC by examination alone without completing his or her

University of California

Our admission guidelines are designed to ensure you are well-prepared to succeed at UC.

If you're interested in entering the University of California as a freshman, you'll have to satisfy these requirements:

  1. Complete a minimum of 15 college-preparatory courses (a-g courses), with at least 11 finished prior to the beginning of your senior year.

    The 15 courses are:

    a. History/social science

    2 years

    b. English

    4 years

    c. Mathematics

    3 years

    d. Laboratory science

    2 years

    e. Language other than English

    2 years

    f. Visual and performing arts

    1 year

    g. College-preparatory elective
    (chosen from the subjects listed above or another course approved by the university)

    1 year

  2. Earn a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or better (3.4 if you're a nonresident) in these courses with no grade lower than a C.

  3. Meet the examination requirement by taking the ACT With Writing or the SAT Reasoning Test by December of your senior year. We don't require SAT Subject Tests, but certain programs on some campuses recommend them, and you can use subject tests to satisfy the "a-g" requirements listed above.  

California students

If you're a state resident who has met the minimum requirements and aren't admitted to any UC campus to which you apply, you'll be offered a spot at another campus if space is available, provided:

  • You rank in the top 9 percent of California high school students, according to our admissions index, or
  • You rank in the top 9 percent of your graduating class at a participating high school. We refer to this as "Eligible in the Local Context" (ELC).
  • A) History/social science

    UC-approved high school courses

    Two years of history/social science, including:

    • one year of world history, cultures and geography (may be a single yearlong course or two one-semester courses), and
    • one year of U.S. history or one-half year of U.S. history and one-half year of civics or American government
    SAT Subject Examination

    U.S. History: Score of 550 satisfies one year.

    World History: Score of 540 satisfies one year.

    AP or IB Examination

    U.S. History: score of 3, 4 or 5 on the AP U.S. History exam;
    score of 5, 6 or 7 on the IB History of the Americas HL exam

    U.S. Government: Score of 3, 4 or 5 on the AP Exam satisfies a half year.

    World History/Cultures/Geography: score of 3, 4 or 5 on the AP exam in European History, World History or Human Geography; score of 5, 6 or 7 on the IB History HL or Geography HL exam

    College courses

    U.S. History/Civics/American Government: grade of C or better in a transferable course of 3 or more semester (4 or more quarter) units in U.S. history, civics or American government

    World History/Cultures/Geography: grade of C or better in a transferable course of 3 or more semester (4 or more quarter) units in world history, cultures and geography

    B) English

    UC-approved high school courses

    Four years of college-preparatory English that include frequent writing, from brainstorming to final paper, as well as reading of classic and modern literature. No more than one year of ESL-type courses can be used to meet this requirement.

    SAT Reasoning Examination

    Writing section: Score of 560 satisfies first three years; score of 680 satisfies entire four-year requirement.

    SAT Subject Examination

    Literature: Score of 560 satisfies first three years.

    AP or IB Examination

    Score of 3, 4 or 5 on the AP English Language and Composition or English Literature and Composition Exam; score of 5, 6 or 7 on the IB Language A1 English HL exam

    College courses

    For each year required through the 11th grade, a grade of C or better in a course of 3 or more semester (4 or more quarter) units in English composition, literature (American or English) or foreign literature in translation. Courses used to satisfy the fourth year of the requirement must be transferable. For lower-division transfer, all courses must be transferable. Literature courses must include substantial work in composition.

    C) Mathematics

    UC-approved high school courses

    Three years (four years recommended) of college-preparatory mathematics that include the topics covered in elementary and advanced algebra and two- and three-dimensional geometry. Approved integrated math courses may be used to fulfill part or all of this requirement, as may math courses taken in the seventh and eighth grades if the high school accepts them as equivalent to its own courses.

    SAT Subject Examination

    Mathematics 1C: Score of 570 satisfies entire requirement.

    Mathematics Level 2: Score of 480 satisfies entire requirement.

    AP or IB Examination

    Score of 3, 4 or 5 on the AP Statistics Exam satisfies elementary and intermediate algebra.

    Score of 3, 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus AB or Calculus BC Exam satisfies three years.

    Score of 5, 6, or 7 on the IB Mathematics HL exam

    College courses

    Grade of C or better in a transferable mathematics course that has intermediate algebra as a prerequisite satisfies the entire requirement. Freshman applicants cannot satisfy this requirement with statistics.

    Three semester (4 quarter) units of non-transferable courses in elementary algebra, geometry, intermediate algebra or trigonometry, with a grade of C or better, satisfy one year of the math requirement.

    D) Laboratory science

    UC-approved high school courses

    Two years (three years recommended) of laboratory science providing fundamental knowledge in two of these three foundational subjects: biology, chemistry and physics. The final two years of an approved three-year integrated science program that provides rigorous coverage of at least two of the three foundational subjects may be used to fulfill this requirement.

    SAT Subject Examination

    Each test clears one year:

    • Biology: Score of 540
    • Chemistry: Score of 530
    • Physics: Score of 530
    AP or IB Examination

    Score of 3, 4 or 5 on any two AP Exams in Biology, Chemistry, Physics B or Physics C, and Environmental Science; score of 5, 6 or 7 on any two IB HL exams in Biology, Chemistry or Physics

    College courses

    For each year of the requirement, a grade of C or better in a transferable course in a natural (physical or biological) science with at least 30 hours of laboratory (not "demonstration")

    E) Language other than English

    UC-approved high school courses

    Two years (three years recommended) of the same language other than English. Courses should emphasize speaking and understanding, and include instruction in grammar, vocabulary, reading, composition and culture. American Sign Language and classical languages, such as Latin and Greek, are acceptable. Courses taken in the seventh and eighth grades may be used to fulfill part or all of this requirement if the high school accepts them as equivalent to its own courses.

    SAT Subject Examination

    The following scores satisfy the entire requirement:

    • Chinese With Listening: 520
    • French/French With Listening: 540
    • German/German With Listening: 510
    • Modern Hebrew: 470
    • Italian: 520
    • Japanese With Listening: 510
    • Korean With Listeninig: 500
    • Latin: 530
    • Spanish/Spanish With Listening: 520
    AP or IB Examination

    Score of 3, 4 or 5 on the AP Language or Literature Exam in French, German, Spanish or Latin (Chinese, Italian and Japanese are pending faculty approval);
    score of 5, 6 or 7 on an IB Language A2 HL exam

    College courses

    Grade of C or better in any transferable course(s) (excluding conversation) held by the college to be equivalent to two years of high school language. Many colleges list the prerequisites for their second course in language as "Language 1 at this college or two years of high school language." In this case, Language 1 clears both years of the requirement.

    F) Visual and performing arts

    UC-approved high school courses

    One yearlong course of visual and performing arts chosen from the following: dance, drama/theater, music or visual art

    AP or IB Examination

    Score of 3, 4 or 5 on the AP History of Art, Studio Art or Music Theory Exam;
    score of 5, 6 or 7 on any one IB HL exam in Dance, Film, Music, Theatre Arts or Visual Arts

    College courses

    Grade of C or better in any transferable course of 3 semester (4 quarter) units that clearly falls within one of four visual/performing arts disciplines: dance, drama/theater, music or visual art

    G) College-preparatory elective

    UC-approved high school courses

    One year (two semesters), in addition to those required in "a-f" above, chosen from the following areas: visual and performing arts (non-introductory-level courses), history, social science, English, advanced mathematics, laboratory science and language other than English (a third year in the language used for the "e" requirement or two years of another language)

    SAT Subject Examination

    U.S. History: Score of 550

    World History: Score of 540

    Writing/English Compositions or Literature: Score of 560

    Mathematics Level 2: Score of 520

    Science (other than taken for "d" requirement): Same tests and scores as listed above under "d"

    Language Other Than English, third year

    • Chinese With Listening: 570
    • French/French With Listening: 590
    • German/German With Listening: 570
    • Modern Hebrew: 500
    • Italian: 570
    • Japanese With Listening: 570
    • Korean With Listening: 550
    • Latin: 580
    • Spanish/Spanish With Listening: 570

    A second Language Other Than English: Same tests and scores as listed under "e"

    AP or IB Examination

    Score of 3, 4 or 5 on any one AP Exam in Computer Science A, Computer Science AB, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Human Geography, Psychology, U.S. Government or Comparative Government; score of 5, 6 or 7 on any one IB HL exam in Economics, Philosophy, Psychology, Social and Cultural Anthropology, or Computer Science

    College courses

    Grade of C or better in one transferable course beyond those listed above as clearing any of the "a-f" requirements; or a transferable course having as a prerequisite the equivalent of two high school years in a second language; or a transferable course equivalent to those that clear the "c," "d" or "e" requirement; or a transferable course of 3 or more semester (4 or more quarter) units in history, social science, or visual or performing arts


Agrochemistry Chemistry
Analytical chemistry Chemistry
Astrochemistry Chemistry
Atmospheric chemistry Chemistry
Biochemistry Chemistry
Chemical biology Chemistry
Chemical engineering Chemistry
Chemical kinetics Chemistry
Chemical physics Chemistry
Chemical thermodynamics Chemistry
Chemo-informatics Chemistry
Cosmochemistry Chemistry
Electrochemistry Chemistry
Environmental chemistry Chemistry
Femtochemistry Chemistry
Flavor chemistry Chemistry
Flow chemistry Chemistry
Geochemistry Chemistry
Green chemistry Chemistry
Histochemistry Chemistry
Hydrogenation chemistry Chemistry
Immunochemistry Chemistry
Inorganic chemistry Chemistry
Marine chemistry Chemistry
Materials science Chemistry
Mathematical chemistry Chemistry
Mechanochemistry Chemistry
Medicinal chemistry Chemistry
Molecular mechanics Chemistry
Nanotechnology Chemistry
Natural product chemistry Chemistry
Neurochemistry Chemistry
Nuclear chemistry Chemistry
Oenology Chemistry
Organic chemistry Chemistry
Organometallic chemistry Chemistry
Petrochemistry Chemistry
Pharmacology Chemistry
Photochemistry Chemistry
Physical chemistry Chemistry
Physical organic chemistry Chemistry
Phytochemistry Chemistry
Polymer chemistry Chemistry
Quantum chemistry Chemistry
Radiochemistry Chemistry
Solid-state chemistry Chemistry
Sonochemistry Chemistry
Spectroscopy Chemistry
Statistical mechanics Chemistry
Supramolecular chemistry Chemistry
Surface chemistry Chemistry
Synthetic chemistry Chemistry
Thermochemistry Chemistry


Acoustics  Physics
Agrophysics  Physics
Atomic, molecular, and optical physics  Physics
Biophysics  Physics
Computational physics  Physics
Condensed matter physics  Physics
Cryogenics  Physics
Dynamics  Physics
Electricity and magnetism  Physics
Electronics  Physics
Fluid dynamics  Physics
Geophysics  Physics
Materials physics  Physics
Mathematical physics  Physics
Mechanics  Physics
Nuclear physics  Physics
Optics  Physics
Particle/High energy physics  Physics
Plasma physics  Physics
Polymer physics  Physics
Quantum physics  Physics
Thermodynamics  Physics
Vehicle dynamics  Physics


Astrobiology Astronomy
Astrochemistry Astronomy
Astrodynamics Astronomy
Astrometry Astronomy
Astrophysics Astronomy
Cosmochemistry Astronomy
Cosmology Astronomy
Extragalactic astronomy Astronomy
Galactic astronomy Astronomy
Physical cosmology Astronomy
Planetary geology Astronomy
Planetary science Astronomy
Solar astronomy Astronomy
Stellar astronomy Astronomy
Atmospheric sciences Earth Science
Biogeography Earth Science
Cartography Earth Science
Climatology Earth Science
Coastal geography Earth Science
Geodesy Earth Science
Geography Earth Science
Geoinformatics Earth Science
Geology Earth Science
Geomorphology Earth Science
Geostatistics Earth Science
Geophysics Earth Science
Glaciology Earth Science
Hydrology Earth Science
Hydrogeology Earth Science
Mineralogy Earth Science
Meteorology Earth Science
Oceanography Earth Science
Paleoclimatology Earth Science
Paleontology Earth Science
Petrology Earth Science
Limnology Earth Science
Seismology Earth Science
Soil science Earth Science
Topography Earth Science
Volcanology Earth Science


Ecology Environmental Science
Freshwater biology Environmental Science
Marine biology Environmental Science
Parasitology Environmental Science
Population dynamics Environmental Science
Environmental chemistry Environmental Science
Environmental soil science Environmental Science
Environmental geology Environmental Science
Toxicology Environmental Science


Anatomy Life sciences (Biology)
Astrobiology Life sciences (Biology)
Bioinformatics Life sciences (Biology)
Biophysics Life sciences (Biology)
Biotechnology Life sciences (Biology)
Botany Life sciences (Biology)
Bryology Life sciences (Biology)
Mycology Life sciences (Biology)
Lichenology Life sciences (Biology)
Palynology Life sciences (Biology)
Phycology (Algology) Life sciences (Biology)
Cell biology (Cytology) Life sciences (Biology)
Chronobiology Life sciences (Biology)
Conservation biology Life sciences (Biology)
Developmental biology Life sciences (Biology)
Embryology Life sciences (Biology)
Gerontology Life sciences (Biology)
Epidemiology Life sciences (Biology)
Ecology Life sciences (Biology)
Evolution Life sciences (Biology)
Evolutionary biology Life sciences (Biology)
Evolutionary developmental biology Life sciences (Biology)
Paleobiology Life sciences (Biology)
Paleontology Life sciences (Biology)
Genetics Life sciences (Biology)
Genomics Life sciences (Biology)
Proteomics Life sciences (Biology)
Population genetics Life sciences (Biology)
Microbiology Life sciences (Biology)
Molecular biology Life sciences (Biology)
Structural biology Life sciences (Biology)
Morphology Life sciences (Biology)
Physiology Life sciences (Biology)
Immunology Life sciences (Biology)
Kinesiology Life sciences (Biology)
Neuroscience Life sciences (Biology)
Histology Life sciences (Biology)
Systematics Life sciences (Biology)
Cladistics Life sciences (Biology)
Phylogeny Life sciences (Biology)
Taxonomy Life sciences (Biology)
Virology Life sciences (Biology)
Zoology Life sciences (Biology)
Arachnology Life sciences (Biology)
Acarology Life sciences (Biology)
Entomology Life sciences (Biology)
Myrmecology Life sciences (Biology)
Ethology Life sciences (Biology)
Helminthology Life sciences (Biology)
Herpetology Life sciences (Biology)
Ichthyology Life sciences (Biology)
Malacology Life sciences (Biology)
Mammalogy Life sciences (Biology)
Cetology Life sciences (Biology)
Physical anthropology Life sciences (Biology)
Nematology Life sciences (Biology)
Ornithology Life sciences (Biology)




[edit] 


Theory of computation Computer sciences
Automata theory (Formal languages) Computer sciences
Computability theory Computer sciences
Computational complexity theory Computer sciences
Concurrency theory Computer sciences
Algorithms Computer sciences
Randomized algorithms Computer sciences
Distributed algorithms Computer sciences
Parallel algorithms Computer sciences
Data structures Computer sciences
Computer architecture Computer sciences
VLSI design Computer sciences
Operating systems Computer sciences
Computer communications (networks) Computer sciences
Information theory Computer sciences
Internet, World wide web Computer sciences
Wireless computing (Mobile computing) Computer sciences
Computer security and reliability Computer sciences
Cryptography Computer sciences
Fault-tolerant computing Computer sciences
Distributed computing Computer sciences
Grid computing Computer sciences
Parallel computing Computer sciences
High-performance computing Computer sciences
Quantum computing Computer sciences
Computer graphics Computer sciences
Image processing Computer sciences
Scientific visualization Computer sciences
Computational geometry Computer sciences

Computer sciences
Software engineering Computer sciences
Formal methods (Formal verification) Computer sciences
Programming languages Computer sciences
Programming paradigms Computer sciences
Object-oriented programming Computer sciences
Functional programming Computer sciences
Program semantics Computer sciences
Type theory Computer sciences
Compilers Computer sciences
Concurrent programming languages Computer sciences
Information science Computer sciences
Database Computer sciences
Relational database Computer sciences
Distributed database Computer sciences
Object database Computer sciences
Multimedia, hypermedia Computer sciences
Data mining Computer sciences
Information retrieval Computer sciences
Artificial intelligence Computer sciences
Automated reasoning Computer sciences
Computer vision Computer sciences
Machine learning Computer sciences
Artificial neural network Computer sciences
Natural language processing (Computational linguistics) Computer sciences
Expert systems Computer sciences
Robotics Computer sciences
Human-computer interaction Computer sciences
Computing in Mathematics, Natural sciences, Engineering and Medicine Computer sciences
Numerical analysis Computer sciences
Algebraic (symbolic) computation Computer sciences
Computational number theory Computer sciences
Computational mathematics Computer sciences
Scientific computing (Computational science) Computer sciences
Computational biology (bioinformatics) Computer sciences
Computational physics Computer sciences
Computational chemistry Computer sciences
Computational neuroscience Computer sciences
Computer-aided engineering Computer sciences
Finite element analysis Computer sciences
Computational fluid dynamics Computer sciences
Computing in Social sciences, Arts and Humanities, Professions Computer sciences
Computational economics Computer sciences
Computational sociology Computer sciences
Computational finance Computer sciences
Humanities computing (Digital Humanities) Computer sciences
Information systems (Business informatics) Computer sciences
Information technology Computer sciences
Management information systems Computer sciences
Health informatics Computer sciences


Algebra Mathematics
Group theory Mathematics
Group representation Mathematics
Ring theory Mathematics
Field theory Mathematics
Probability theory Mathematics
Measure theory Mathematics
Ergodic theory Mathematics
Stochastic process Mathematics
Geometry and Topology Mathematics
Applied mathematics Mathematics
Mathematical statistics Mathematics
Probability Mathematics
Approximation theory Mathematics
Numerical analysis Mathematics
Linear algebra (Vector space) Mathematics
Multilinear algebra Mathematics
Lie algebra Mathematics
Associative algebra Mathematics
Non-associative algebra Mathematics
Universal algebra Mathematics
Homological algebra Mathematics
Category theory Mathematics
Lattice theory (Order theory) Mathematics
Differential algebra Mathematics
Analysis Mathematics
Real analysis Mathematics
Calculus Mathematics
Complex analysis Mathematics
Functional analysis Mathematics
Operator theory Mathematics
Non-standard analysis Mathematics
Harmonic analysis Mathematics
p-adic analysis Mathematics
Ordinary differential equations Mathematics
Partial differential equations Mathematics
General topology Mathematics
Algebraic topology Mathematics
Geometric topology Mathematics
Differential topology Mathematics
Algebraic geometry Mathematics
Differential geometry Mathematics
Projective geometry Mathematics
Affine geometry Mathematics
Non-Euclidean geometry Mathematics
Convex geometry Mathematics
Discrete geometry Mathematics
Trigonometry Mathematics
Number theory Mathematics
Analytic number theory Mathematics
Algebraic number theory Mathematics
Geometric number theory Mathematics
Logic and Foundations of mathematics Mathematics
Set theory Mathematics
Proof theory Mathematics
Model theory Mathematics
Recursion theory Mathematics
Modal logic Mathematics
Intuitionistic logic Mathematics
Optimization (Mathematical programming) Mathematics
Operations research Mathematics
Linear programming Mathematics
Dynamical systems Mathematics
Chaos theory Mathematics
Fractal geometry Mathematics
Mathematical physics Mathematics
Quantum field theory Mathematics
Statistical mechanics Mathematics
Information theory Mathematics
Cryptography Mathematics
Combinatorics Mathematics
Coding theory Mathematics
Graph theory Mathematics
Game theory Mathematics


Computational statistics Statistics
Data mining Statistics
Regression Statistics
Simulation Statistics
Bootstrap (statistics) Statistics
Design of experiments Statistics
Block design and Analysis of variance Statistics
Response surface methodology Statistics
Statistical modelling Statistics
Biostatistics Statistics
Epidemiology Statistics
Multivariate analysis Statistics
Structural equation model Statistics
Time series Statistics
Reliability theory Statistics
Quality control Statistics
Statistical theory Statistics
Decision theory Statistics
Mathematical statistics Statistics
Probability Statistics
Sample Survey Statistics
Sampling theory Statistics
Survey methodology Statistics




Complex systems Systems Science
Complexity theory Systems Science
Cybernetics Systems Science
Biocybernetics Systems Science
Engineering cybernetics Systems Science
Management cybernetics Systems Science
Medical cybernetics Systems Science
New Cybernetics Systems Science
Second-order cybernetics Systems Science
Control theory Systems Science
Control engineering Systems Science
Control systems Systems Science
Dynamical systems Systems Science
Operations research Systems Science
Systems dynamics Systems Science
Systems analysis Systems Science
Systems theory Systems Science
Developmental systems theory Systems Science
General systems theory Systems Science
Linear time-invariant systems Systems Science
Mathematical system theory Systems Science




Anthropology of religion Anthropology
Applied anthropology Anthropology
Archaeology Anthropology
Cultural anthropology Anthropology
Ethnobiology Anthropology
Ethnography Anthropology
Ethnology Anthropology
Ethnopoetics Anthropology
Evolutionary anthropology Anthropology
Experimental archaeology Anthropology
Historical archaeology Anthropology
Linguistic anthropology Anthropology
Medical anthropology Anthropology
Physical anthropology Anthropology
Psychological anthropology Anthropology
Zooarchaeology Anthropology
Anthrozoology Anthropology




Macroeconomics Economics
Microeconomics Economics
Behavioural economics Economics
Bioeconomics Economics
Comparative economics Economics
Socialist economics Economics
Development economics Economics
Economic geography Economics
Economic history Economics
Economic sociology Economics
Energy economics Economics
Entrepreneurial Economics Economics
Environmental economics Economics
Evolutionary economics Economics
Financial economics Economics
Heterodox economics Economics
Green economics Economics
Feminist economics Economics
Islamic economics Economics
Industrial organization Economics
International economics Economics
Institutional economics Economics
Labor economics Economics
Law and economics Economics

Economics
Managerial economics Economics
Monetary economics Economics
Neuroeconomics Economics
Public finance Economics
Public economics Economics
Real estate economics Economics
Resource economics Economics
Welfare economics Economics
Political economy Economics
Socioeconomics Economics
Transport economics Economics

Economics
Economic methodology Economics
Computational economics Economics
Econometrics Economics
Mathematical economics Economics
Economic statistics Economics
Time series Economics
Experimental economics Economics


Anthropological linguistics Linguistics
Applied linguistics Linguistics
Biolinguistics Linguistics
Clinical linguistics and Speech and language pathology Linguistics
Cognitive linguistics Linguistics
Comparative linguistics Linguistics
Computational Linguistics Linguistics
Corpus linguistics Linguistics
Developmental linguistics and Language acquisition Linguistics
Dialectology and Dialectometry Linguistics
Discourse analysis Linguistics
Etymology Linguistics
Evolutionary linguistics Linguistics
Forensic linguistics Linguistics
Geolinguistics Linguistics
Historical linguistics Linguistics
Lexis Linguistics
Linguistic typology Linguistics
Morphology Linguistics
Neurolinguistics Linguistics
Philology Linguistics
Phonetics Linguistics
Phonology Linguistics
Phraseology Linguistics
Pragmatics Linguistics
Psycholinguistics Linguistics
Quantitative linguistics Linguistics
Sociolinguistics Linguistics
Stylistics Linguistics
Syntax Linguistics
Semantics Linguistics
Writing systems and Orthography Linguistics


Behavior analysis Psychology
Biopsychology Psychology
Cognitive psychology Psychology
Clinical psychology Psychology
Cultural psychology Psychology
Developmental psychology Psychology
Educational psychology Psychology
Evolutionary psychology Psychology
Experimental psychology Psychology
Forensic psychology Psychology
Health psychology Psychology
Humanistic psychology Psychology
Industrial and organizational psychology Psychology
Music therapy Psychology
Neuropsychology Psychology
Personality psychology Psychology
Psychometrics Psychology
Psychology of religion Psychology
Psychophysics Psychology
Sensation and perception psychology Psychology


Decision sciences Cognitive Sciences
Communication sciences Cognitive Sciences


Cartography Geography
Human geography Geography
Critical geography Geography
Cultural geography Geography
Feminist geography Geography
Economic geography Geography
Development geography Geography
Historical geography Geography
Time geography Geography
Political geography & geopolitics Geography
Marxist geography Geography
Military geography Geography
Strategic geography Geography
Population geography Geography
Social geography Geography
Behavioral geography Geography
Children's geographies Geography
Health geography Geography
Tourism geography Geography
Urban geography Geography
Environmental geography Geography
Physical geography Geography
Biogeography Geography
Climatology Geography
Palaeoclimatology Geography
Coastal geography Geography
Geomorphology Geography
Geodesy Geography
Hydrology/Hydrography Geography
Glaciology Geography
Limnology Geography
Oceanography Geography
Pedology Geography
Landscape ecology Geography
Palaeogeography Geography
Regional geography Geography


Epistemology Philosophy
Ethics Philosophy
Logic Philosophy
Philosophy of mind Philosophy
Philosophy of science Philosophy


Comparative politics Political Science
Game theory Political Science
Geopolitics and political geography Political Science
Ideology Political Science
Political economy Political Science
Political psychology, bureaucratic, administrative and judicial behaviour Political Science
Psephology (voting systems and electoral behaviour) Political Science

Political Science

Political Science
Public administration Political Science
Public policy Political Science
Local government studies* Supranational and intergovernmental politics Political Science
Political science of religion Political Science
International relations theory Political Science


[edit] Engineering


Aeronautical engineering Engineering
Aerospace engineering Engineering
Agricultural engineering Engineering
Agricultural science Engineering
Biomedical engineering Engineering
Bioengineering Engineering
Chemical engineering Engineering
Civil engineering Engineering
Computer engineering Engineering
Control engineering Engineering
Electrical engineering Engineering
Industrial engineering Engineering
Language engineering Engineering
Marine engineering Engineering
Materials engineering Engineering
Mechanical engineering Engineering
Mining engineering Engineering
Nuclear engineering Engineering
Polymer engineering Engineering
Software engineering Engineering
Systems engineering Engineering


Conservation medicine Health Sciences
Dentistry Health Sciences
Optometry Health Sciences
Medicine Health Sciences
Anatomy Health Sciences
Dermatology Health Sciences
Gastroenterology Health Sciences
Gynecology Health Sciences
Immunology Health Sciences
Internal medicine Health Sciences
Neurology Health Sciences
Ophthalmology Health Sciences
Pathology Health Sciences
Pathophysiology Health Sciences
Pediatrics Health Sciences
Pharmacy Health Sciences
Physiology Health Sciences
Psychiatry Health Sciences
Radiology Health Sciences
Toxicology Health Sciences
Urology Health Sciences
Nutrition Health Sciences
Nursing Health Sciences
Pharmacology Health Sciences
Physical therapy Health Sciences
Veterinary medicine Health Sciences
Animal husbandry Agronomy
Aquaculture Agronomy
Agriculture Agronomy
Food science Agronomy
Forestry Agronomy
Horticulture Agronomy
Hydroponics Agronomy
Permaculture Agronomy
Accounting Management
Business Strategy Management
Finance Management
Marketing Management
Organizational Behavior Management
Operations Management



ċ
K-12EducationLibertarianCommunitarianOptInGovernment.vsd
(63k)
W. Alexander Hagen,
Jun 28, 2011, 8:14 PM
Comments